Weed 101: Sativa vs. Indica - What's The Difference And Which Is Better?

Weed 101: Sativa vs. Indica - What's The Difference And Which Is Better?

Are you smoking indica or sativa? Here's why it matters and what the difference between the two is. Cannabis. Weed. Ganja. Charas. Hash. Pot. Marijuana. The devil's lettuce. Jazz Cabbage. It's known by many names and consumed in many forms, but the one thing most people can safely agree on is that weed is just great has a multitude of uses. Parts of the cannabis plant are used to create medicines (CBD oil), hemp-based cloth, and to treat a range of disorders. In India, recreational use of cannabis is strictly prohibited under the Narcotics Drugs and Psychotropic Substances Act, 1985. But there are exceptions to this, which we'll cover in this story. Different strains of cannabis are used to create different medicines and products. The three species of cannabis are Cannabis Sativa, Cannabis Indica, or Cannabis Ruderalis. These are further categorized into thousands of strains. Today we'll explain what you should know about these, and we'll also dispel some common myths and misconceptions around the different types of marijuana.   In 1753, botanist Carl Linnaeus, in his book, Species Plantarum, which documented every known species of plant at the time, identified marijuana as JUST one species of plant - Cannabis sativa. There were no two strains, it was just the one type, according to him. Cannabis indica was discovered by biologist Jean-Baptiste Lamarck in 1785, when he was given marijuana specimens from India. On the basis of physical characteristics like the thickness of the plant's bark, the shape of leaves, and the height of the plant, Lamarck felt that this plant should be categorized differently from Cannabis sativa. Thus, he coined the species Cannabis indica. "They categorized them into two types back then because hemp was an industrial resource - for fibre and medicine alike. Hemp and cannabis were often used interchangeably. The amount of hemp fibre you'd get from indica and sativa would vary because they're both different sizes. These categories served a purely economic purpose back then." Raghav Priyadarshi, CEO, Savikalpa At some point in the history of marijuana's use, this classification which was based on appearance and economics extended to also mean different effects that each strain had.

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Chronic pain is an ailment that nobody needs to suffer

Chronic pain is an ailment that nobody needs to suffer

Chronic pain is as real an ailment as any and is characterized by persistence. Defined simply, chronic pain is pain that is ongoing and which lasts longer than 12 weeks. In fact, signals of chronic pain tend to remain active in the nervous system for weeks, months and even years. A major misconception of chronic pain is that it is caused by some unrecognized injury, inflammation or disease, and requires rest for healing and relief. Recent advances, however, suggest that chronic pain is mostly a product of abnormal neural signalling, with biopsychosocial dimensions, and therefore requires a multimodal treatment approach. Most physicians lack an understanding of treatment options for chronic pain and tend to rely on medication alone, which often results in over-reliance on mostly unproven and often harmful drugs. Added to that is the growing dependence on costly and unproven neuromodulation techniques for treating chronic pain. This over-reliance results from a combination of aggressive drug industry marketing, lack of access to multidisciplinary services like physiotherapy and psychology and also perverse financial incentives for care givers to promote shorter consultations, drug prescriptions and invasive interventions. Opioids offer a solution in that they are highly effective in treating chronic acute pains, but these are too expensive for most patients in low and middle-income countries. The other challenge with opioids is diversion for recreational use that can cause an ‘opioid crisis’. Patrick Radden Keefe’s Empire of Pain is an excellent exposition of how chronic pain was misused by a US pharmaceutical firm in a marketing campaign for it opioid formulation. Opioids can be devastating, given their high likelihood of abuse and addiction. But due to the malpractices of some companies and the US opioid crisis, they may no longer be easily available even for cancer patients, for whom opioids are scientifically needed. We must encourage a nuanced discussion on therapeutic options to cure chronic pain that takes a risk-benefit analysis into account. Also, chronic pain must be given a ‘name’ for ease of explanation to patients. Doctors must explain to patients what they are suffering from in language they can understand. Descriptions like “your pain is a product of abnormal neural signalling with biopsychosocial dimensions" could increase patient anxiety. Explanations should be simpler. Such as: “You have nociplastic pain that will be adequately managed by a team of expert caregivers" or “this condition does not require expensive imaging and blood tests". Another need of the hour is to establish dedicated ‘pain clinics’ at the community level with multidisciplinary teams at their helm. These teams should include physiotherapists, clinical psychologists-psychiatrists, occupational therapists, pain specialists and rheumatologists. Importantly, these specialists should be trained in differentiating nociceptive pain from nociplastic pain. Another aspect for us to address chronic pain would be to ensure the availability of drugs with proven efficacy in treating nociplastic pains. These include serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs) such as duloxetine, among others; and other anti-depressants, in lower doses, such as amitriptyline, and gabapentinoids such as gabapentin. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs must be avoided as they are not very effective, and their long-term use is fraught with the possibility of serious adverse effects. Likewise, simple painkillers like paracetamol should also be avoided as they are not effective. Cannabinoids, a class of drugs derived from the cannabis plant, and more commonly used by Ayurvedic physicians in their whole-plant format, may offer an answer as they are strong relievers of nociplastic pain. In several Western countries, cannabis has been taken out of the category of a ‘controlled substance’ and is now being used to treat a host of conditions, while also being misused as a recreational drug. This class of drugs, however, risks facing the same fate as opioids, waylaying another set of drugs that could be useful if given by experts on the basis of correct indications and all the precautions against misuse. Cannabinoids have a deep-rooted and old India connection. For thousands of years, cannabinoids have been used in Ayurvedic medicines. Their pharmacological properties must be scientifically studied by pharmacologists, especially from the standpoint of controlling nociplastic pains. Cannabinoid receptors are distributed widely in different parts of the central nervous system, including in the brain. Pharmacologists may like to investigate this ‘Indian’ drug to find out the mechanistic basis of nociplastic pain control, if any. That may open a path for scientifically conducted and strictly controlled trials for its efficacy and adverse effects both over a short period (drug trial) as well as over long periods in phase-IV (post-marketing) surveys. Chronic pain is real. It deserves to be taken more seriously. The big question is whether cannabinoid medicines could help. The jury is still out on that, as experts will have to submit these medicines to authorities for appropriately conducted, double-blind controlled trials in patients with chronic nociplastic pains. It is critical for these trials that they involve specialists who can correctly and accurately diagnose fibromyalgia (nociplastic) pains. If these drugs prove to be effective and without any short-term or long-term adverse effects, then applications may be submitted to the appropriate authority for their approval for use by practitioners of modern medicine. Anand N. Malaviya is former head of the department of medicine and chief of clinical immunology and rheumatology services, All-India Institute of Medical Sciences

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Cannabis: Back with a Bhang

Cannabis: Back with a Bhang

Why is smoking a joint illegal, but you can walk into a government-run bhang shop and down an equally potent bhang lassi? Where does the government get its weed (and can you get some)? And can a doctor actually prescribe you a cannabis pill for better sleep? Episode 5 of #DontRunIntoGlass delves into the legality of cannabis, with a focus on the emerging space of medical cannabis - which, you may or may not know, is entirely legal in India. We're joined by Raghav Priyadarshi, CEO of Ayurveda-inspired cannabis medicine brand Savikalpa Sciences. Tune in :)

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Does India Have Patience, Will And Resources To Build World's Top Cannabis Medicine Industry?

Does India Have Patience, Will And Resources To Build World's Top Cannabis Medicine Industry?

Consider the size of the opportunity — today’s billion dollar global medical cannabis industry is expected to hit USD 100 billion by 2028. That’s a 100x growth in the next six years. We’ve missed the bus once — India is the largest producer and exporter of licit opium in the world, contributing over 50% of global volumes. Yet there is not a single Indian firm that is a global leader in manufacturing opioid medications, a USD 40 billion market annually!

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Shift Focus To Yourself: A Guide To Cannabis Wellness with Savikalpa Sciences

Shift Focus To Yourself: A Guide To Cannabis Wellness with Savikalpa Sciences

What Makes It Awesome? We all probably feel the need for safe, natural and easily accessible ways of coping with stress. Especially in current times when normal life has been disrupted, things are more unpredictable than usual and we’re unable to meet friends, family and people in general, as much as we’d like to. Naturally, this has affected people's health - our muscles are tensing more than usual, headaches are getting worse, and we're having a hard time focusing these days - all signs of stress and anxiety that we should acknowledge. This on top of existing ailments that affect one or the other amongst us - be it chronic pains, period cramps, migraines or trouble sleeping. To help keep your mind and body at ease, Savikalpa Sciences solutions might be something you might want to look into. This brand incorporates medically and scientifically-approved cannabis in their products to relax and calm you. We also know that this is a fairly new concept, and you may not be familiar with it. So, read on. Savikalpa Sciences is a new health and wellness firm that is offering medical cannabis solutions, rooted in Ayurveda, to provide relief from many ailments. Savikalpa offers virtual consultations with doctors trained in cannabinoid treatment and patient care to guide persons keen on exploring this alternative pathway to well-being. Savikalpa believes that plant-derived medicines give a holistic and natural approach to overcome pain, anxiety, stress and insomnia related problems. To ensure high standards of quality, safety and efficacy of its products, Savikalpa is working with some of India’s leading pharmaceutical research firms such as Dabur Research Foundation to develop scientifically and legally-approved cannabis medicines. With Savikalpa’s online “Virtual Clinic”, you can book a private video consultation with a panel of doctors who specialize in this kind of treatment. Their team is ready to lead you through every step of the process, from intake and education of medicines to assessment of your triggers as well as on-going patient care.

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Ela Capital Takes A Position in Gather, Ahead of Series A Funding

Ela Capital Takes A Position in Gather, Ahead of Series A Funding

BRITISH VIRGIN ISLANDS / ACCESSWIRE / March 15, 2021 / Ela Capital takes a position in Gather with a six figure convertible note along with tokens ahead of our scheduled and planned Series A funding round. Founded by Vijay Sappani in Toronto, Canada, Ela Capital is a venture capital firm, participating in private placements and providing advisory services to fellow founders and visionaries in the health & wellness, climate change & sustainability and DTC sectors generally. With a business degree and twenty years in pharma, government, and CPG under his belt, Vijay Sappani is a diversified entrepreneur and an angel investor in several start-ups. Vijay is founder and significant shareholder of TerrAscend Corp (TER), a multi-billion-dollar cannabis multi-state operator (MSO) in the United States. Vijay is also the Cofounder of Qunuba Sciences, High12 brands, Savikalpa Sciences, and Materia Ventures. Since 2018, Ela capital has diversified and invested in over 75 companies globally, including Momentus Space, Docsend, Carbonclick to name a few. Apart from taking a sizable hybrid vested position, Ela Capital's network and experience will offer growth opportunities for Gather to enter into new markets. Ela Capital has also expressed interest in joining The Gather Foundation. On the investment, Vijay Sappani, Ela Capital Founder & CEO stated: "As an entrepreneur and angel investor, part of my mission is to do philanthropic work to channel our energy for the healing of the planet we're living in, through investing in fundamental issues such as girl's education, rare diseases, and supporting democracy and freedom in the public policy space. Decentralization of the internet is also one of our major focuses when we're investing, as we believe in a future where the decision-making process should be decentralized. Gather and what they promise is perfectly fitting into our mindset for the future and we're very excited to be a part of this journey." Gather Founder & CEO Reggie Jerath added: "Even though our core technology is crypto & blockchain centered, our main users are outside the echo chambers of crypto. Ela Capital's very first crypto investment fortifies our goal of attracting non-crypto people to the industry, paving the way for mass adoption." About Ela Capital Ela Capital is a seed stage operational focused impact investment family office providing investment and advisory services to visionary founders with disruptive ideas. We prioritize companies with ESG goals in the health & wellness, climate change & sustainability and DTC sectors generally. Our team's strength lies in cannabis, vegan & sustainability CPG, rare genetic disorders, life sciences and India focused ventures. We currently have investments and operational bandwidth in Canada, US, Europe, Asia, LATAM and Oceania and in over 75 companies. About Gather Network Gather has developed a powerful new technology that allows web and mobile developers to earn money by contributing processing power , unlike any other digital monetization tool available today. Imagine an Internet where web and application developers can generate revenue without having to rely on intrusive Ads. A new revenue stream without ads, and one that is reliable and rewarding. The processing power gathered will then be redistributed, providing a cheaper alternative to current Cloud markets products. Gather is unlocking a new type of business model for the internet by allowing publishers to monetize without ads and by providing businesses and developers access to affordable and reliable processing power.

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